Wednesday, February 10, 2016

Open Access Journal: Canadio-Byzantina: A newsletter published by the Canadian Committee of Byzantinists

Canadio-Byzantina: A newsletter published by the Canadian Committee of Byzantinists
https://uottawa.scholarsportal.info/ojs/public/journals/9/pageHeaderTitleImage_en_US.gif
A newsletter published by the Canadian Committee of Byzantinists.








1992

No. 1 (January 1992)


Tuesday, February 9, 2016

Monuments of Mosul in Danger

Monuments of Mosul in Danger
The project Monuments of Mosul in Danger (Ohrožená architektura města Mosulu) aims to document and research Mosul monuments that have been destroyed by ISIS since June 2014 (see About the Project). As the first output of the project, we are releasing a list and interactive map of destroyed monuments created through analysis of satellite imagery. The list and map are interconnected with profile lists of individual monuments showing satellite images documenting the scope of the destruction. The map documents the situation as of the end of August 2015. We have failed to identify six of 38 destroyed structures (labeled as unknown structure). We would be grateful for any additional information that would help us to identify them. 

Do not hesitate to contact us should we have made any mistakes in our identifications. Also, any supportive documentation related to the endangered Mosul architecture would be appreciated.

High resolution plates fron "La Porte d’Horemheb au Xe pylône de Karnak"

High resolution plates fron "La Porte d’Horemheb au Xe pylône de Karnak"
Jordan-Bickel-Chappaz_La_Porte_d’Horemheb_au_Xe_pylône_de_Karnak_img

Michel JORDAN (dessins), Susanne BICKEL & Jean-Luc CHAPPAZ, avec des contributions de Faried ADROM et Éric RICHARD, La Porte d’Horemheb au Xe pylône de Karnak (CSÉG 13), Genève 2015.
Entrepris sous le règne d’Amenhotep III et entièrement décoré sous celui d’Horemheb, le Xe pylône de Karnak signalait l’entrée méridionale du grand temple d’Amon, tout en magnifiant l’accès au dromos conduisant vers les sanctuaires de Mout, Khonsou ou Kamoutef. La qualité et la finesse d’exécution des décors – non exempts d’irrégularités graphiques – en rehaussent la majesté et rendent toujours actuel le jugement de Champollion.
Cet ouvrage, fruit de plusieurs missions des équipes du Fonds pour l’Égyptologie de Genève, situe le monument, resté inédit à ce jour, dans son contexte historique et topographique, puis analyse les principes architecturaux de son élévation. L’attention est ensuite portée sur la porte de granite, dont les scènes sont reproduites, reconstituées et commentées de différents points de vue (notamment religion ou histoire de l’art). L’avant-porte en grès et le socle du colosse sud-ouest, également restés inédits, constituent les deux derniers chapitres de l’étude.

Planches épigraphiques:
Chap.
Page
Légende
02-01
-
02-02
-
03-01
49
03-02
50
03-03
51
04-01
56 a
04-02
56 b
04-03
59
04-04
61
04-05
65
04-06
67
04-07
71
04-08
73
04-09
77
04-10
79
05-01
84
05-02
85
05-03
89
05-04
93
05-05
97
05-06
101
05-07
105
05-08
109
06-01
112 a
06-02
112 b
06-03
115
06-04
119
06-05
121
06-06
125
06-07
129
06-08
131
06-09
135
06-10
139
07-01
149
07-02
151
07-03
153
07-04
157
07-05
160
07-06
161
07-07
165
07-08
167
09-01
185
09-02
189
09-03
195
09-04
199
10-01
210
10-02
211
10-03
221
11-01
225
11-02
232

Online Guide to Evagrius Ponticus

[First posted in AWOL 17 January 2012, updated 9 February 2016]

Guide to Evagrius Ponticus
edited by Joel Kalvesmaki
http://evagriusponticus.net/images/EvPontP923-290r-bw.gif

Evagrius Ponticus (b. 345 in Ibora; d. 399 in Egypt), a monastic theologian, was one of the most talented intellects of the fourth century. Circulating in elite ecclesiastical circles of Cappadocia and Asia Minor, he began his career under Basil of Caesarea and Gregory of Nazianzus, serving with the latter in Constantinople through a stormy tenure that culminated in the Second Ecumenical Council (381). Known then as a brilliant heresiologist, Evagrius seemed destined for a successful ecclesiastical career. He chose a different course, and fled to Jerusalem, where he took vows in the monastic communities of Rufinus and Melania. From there he traveled to Egypt and lived in monasteries in Nitria and Kellia. In Egypt he wrote extensively in a variety of genres—letters, proverbs, brief sayings (chapters), and treatises—nearly all geared toward explaining and analyzing vice and virtue, demons and angels, psychological and psychosomatic phenomena—in sum, the life of the ascetic. His accounts are set, sometimes explicitly, oftentimes pensively, within a well-developed metaphysical system that responded to both classical philosophy (Plato, Aristotle, Stoicism) and the theology of some of the most accomplished Christian intellectuals (Clement of Alexandria, Origen, Gregory of Nazianzus).
Although well connected in his own time, Evagrius fell into disrepute in the sixth century, when his writings, along with those of Origen and Didymus the Blind, were associated with a theological strain of Origenism condemned at the Fifth Ecumenical Council (553). The more speculative of Evagrius's writings fell out of circulation in the Byzantine Greek manuscript tradition. Those works survive in a number of other languages, principally Syriac, Armenian, Georgian, and Arabic—linguistic traditions whose reception of Origen and Evagrius were not as controversial. His writings deeply influenced many theologians and monastic writers, including Sts. John Cassian, "Dionysius the Areopagite," Maximus Confessor, John Climacus, Isaac of Nineveh, and Simeon the New Theologian. The Armenian Orthodox Church commemorates him, as did some Syriac-speaking Orthodox churches, but his condemnation is maintained by the Eastern Orthodox Church and, with important caveats (e.g., his recent inclusion in Butler's Lives of the Saints), the Roman Catholic Church.
This Guide provides definitive lists of Evagrius's works, of editions and translations of those works, and of studies related to his life and thought. It includes an inventory of key ancient sources that refer to Evagrius and a display of imagery from the ancient world. Updated quarterly, the Guide will gradually introduce a manuscript checklist, images of manuscripts, transcriptions of those manuscripts, and open source critical editions of Evagrius's writings.

Monday, February 8, 2016

Coming Soon: VÉgA Vocabulaire de l’Égyptien Ancien - Vocabulary of Ancient Egyptian

VÉgA Vocabulaire de l’Égyptien Ancien - Vocabulary of Ancient Egyptian
Vocabulaire de l’Égyptien Ancien
Le VÉgA, ou Vocabulaire de l’Égyptien Ancien, constitue une innovation dans le domaine de l’égyptologie. Ce dictionnaire numérique en ligne inédit est le fruit d’une collaboration public/privé dans le cadre du LabEx Archimede au sein de l’Université Paul-Valéry Montpellier, ainsi que des recherches des égyptologues et des méthodologies du design et de l’informatique. Il vise à devenir pour l’égyptologie une source incontournable et sans cesse actualisée, ainsi qu’un support de collaborations scientifiques internationales pour les décennies à venir. Grâce au VÉgA et à ses divers niveaux de lecture, chaque utilisateur, qu’il soit amateur ou professionnel, étudiant débutant ou linguiste, pourra étudier les mots du vocabulaire égyptien, en accédant en ligne à l’information académique la plus récente disponible sur le sujet.
VÉgA, Vocabulary of Ancient Egyptian, is an innovation in the field of Egyptology. This new online digital dictionary is the result of private/public collaboration within the LabEx Archimede at the University Paul-Valéry Montpellier. It is also the product of research carried out by Egyptologists as well as design and computer software methodologies. The aim is not only to be an indispensable and regularly updated source of information for Egyptology, but this online dictionary also strives to be a medium for international scientific collaborations for many years to come. Thanks to VÉgA, every user, whether they be an amateur, professional, student or linguist, will be able to study the Egyptian words through online access to the most up-to-date academic information available on the subject.

The Campbell Bonner Magical Gems Database

 [First posted in AWOL 9 August 2013, updated 8 February 2016]

The Campbell Bonner Magical Gems Database
http://www2.szepmuveszeti.hu/talismans/images/fejlec.gif

Magical gems

The designation magical gem is a category of modern archaeology, which denotes the most sophisticated amulet type of the Roman Imperial Period. Magical gems were carved of precious stones sized 1 to 3 centimeters, chiefly between the 1st century BC to the 4th century AD, and were designed to bring their owners health, prosperity and love. Their typology follows the shapes of Graeco-Roman glyptics complemented with a few Mesopotamian and Egyptian variants. They are distinguished by their characteristic engravings of inscriptions, signs and images, which usually appear on both faces of the gems, sometimes even on the edge. (For a more detailed definition of magical gems, see our Glossary.)

The Campbell Bonner Magical Gems Database

Magical gems known today number about 4000 pieces and are preserved in different museums and private collections worldwide, often inaccessible for the public. The groundbreaking, and still fundamental, study on magical gems was published in 1950 by American scholar Campbell Bonner, who then described a tenth of the corpus in his Studies on Magical Amulets. In 2004 Simone Michel listed over 2800 pieces in her monograph Die Magischen Gemmen
Named after Bonner, the primary aim of the Campbell Bonner Magical Gems Database (CBd) is to bring the entire corpus of magical gems online in order to make them better accessible for both scholars and the public, and to facilitate their study through the potentials offered by a digital database. Since its launch in 2010 the database has grown to be a much used research tool, and has helped recognize the genre of magical gems as an important object group of the classical material tradition. 
A further incentive of CBd is to publish the second, online edition of Bonner’s Studies on Magical Amulets within the framework of the database, revised and enlarged by leading scholars of the field.

ANE 2: A DISCUSSION LIST FOR THE STUDY OF THE ANCIENT NEAR EAST

ANE 2: A DISCUSSION LIST FOR THE STUDY OF THE ANCIENT NEAR EAST

[n.b. Today is the tenth anniversary of the founding of ANE-2] 
https://xa.yimg.com/kq/groups/17235518/homepage/name/974744.jpg?type=hr

A successor to the Ancient Near East Discussion List originally hosted by the Oriental Institute at the University of Chicago.

ANE 2 is a moderated academic discussion list that focuses on topics and issues of interest in Ancient Near Eastern Studies, from the Indus to the Nile, and from the beginnings of human habitation to the rise of Islam. It is intended to provide a forum for the exchange of ideas on these topics between and among scholars and students actively engaged in research and study of the Ancient Near East.

Active (on-list) participation in ANE 2 assumes an informed knowledge of the ancient Near East and adherence to List Protocols (which are available at http://groups.yahoo.com/group/ANE-2/files/ANE%202%20Protocols
and are sent to each new subscriber upon approval of subscription application).

The act of subscribing to the list signifies the agreement of the subscriber to follow these protocols and to accept the adjudications of the Moderators.

ANE 2 is international in scope. List Members should expect to be able to read postings in English, French and German. Participants are free to post in any of these languages, and, upon occasion, in other languages used in the study of the Ancient Near East.

Moderators:

Trudy S. Kawami, Ph.D.
Columbia University Art History & Archaeology
Director of Research, Arthur M. Sackler Foundation

N. P. Lemche
Professor Dr.Theol.
Department of Biblical Exegesis
The University of Copenhagen

Marc Cooper
Missouri State University
Department of History

Robert Whiting
University of Helsinki

Charles E. Jones
Penn State University Library

Jeffrey B. Gibson, D.Phil. (Oxon)