Wednesday, November 30, 2016

Open Access Journal: Mediterranean Archaeology and Archaeometry

[First posted in AWOL 5 November 2009. Updated 30 November 2016]

Mediterranean Archaeology and Archaeometry (MAA)
ISSN ( print ): 1108-9628
ISSN ( online ): 2241-8121
MAA is converted to full online journal free access to whole texts as .pdf files from last year. The process is ongoing. The printed version (2001-2014) is kept only if authors ask for back issues or if individuals or libraries require printed volumes.

As from 2015 frequency is increased to 3 times per year and there is an advertisement page too. The Journal will keep the rapid reviewing procedure following the standard double blind review and ensures swift publication of high quality papers in innovation or important applications and excavation reports related to the Mediterranean region.

Mediterranean Archaeology & Archaeometry (MAA) is an interdisciplinary International Journal issued by The University of the Aegean, Department of Mediterranean Studies, Rhodes, Greece. MAA is published since 2001 and from 2008 is operating in updated format.
All Issues

+ Volume 1 (2001)

Open Access Journal: Athena Review

Athena Review: Journal of Archaeology, History, and Exploration
Issue index:
Vol. 1, No 1:   Romano-British Sites & Museums I: Forts and military sites; Late Iron Age Celts; Angkor Wat; Peter Martyr.
Vol. 1, No 2:   Romano-British Sites & Museums II: Towns, villas, markets, baths; New World Voyages of William Dampier.
Vol. 1, No. 3:   New World Explorers I: South America & Caribbean; Vikings in Vinland; Rivers from Space.
Vol. 1, No. 4:   Sites & Museums in Roman Gaul I; Thracian Treasures; Buddhist Monasteries in Tibet.
Vol. 2, No. 1:   New World Explorers II: Yucatán; Great Basin Archaeology.
Vol. 2, No.2:   Maya Lowlands: Tikal, Palenque; Egyptian papyri; Sutton Hoo.
Vol. 2, No.3:   Romans on the Danube; Viking ships and sagas; Andean Petroglyphs.
Vol. 2, No.4:   Neanderthals Meet Modern Humans.
Vol. 3, No.1: Byzantine Cultures, East and West; Buried silk road cities of Khotan.
Vol. 3, No.2:   New World Explorers III: Peopling of the Americas
Vol. 3, No.3: Minoan Palaces of Crete: New Interpretations; El Mirón Cave, Spain
Vol. 3, No.4: Rediscovering Lost Civilizations: Reports from the Field.
Vol. 4, No.1: Homo erectus: current findings on an early human ancestor;  The prehistory of Sardinia
Vol. 4, No.2: The Flowering of the Gothic in Northern France: Gothic Art and Architecture from Paris to Picardie
Vol. 4, No.3: The Looting of Archaeological Sites: Looting and the Antiquities Market; Central America as a Case  Study; Bering Strait Legal Market in Antiquities
Vol. 4, No.4: China
Vol 5, No.1: Records of Life: fossils as original sources


Europeana EAGLE Project Stories

Europeana EAGLE Project Stories
EAGLE Portal
In the EAGLE project, we believe that every inscription has a story to tell! It is thanks to inscriptions that we are informed of several details of the every-day life in Antiquity; inscriptions can be used to open a window on our past and start a fascinating journey among men that lived in Europe thousands of years ago. For instance, would you like to know how people used to celebrate victories in the most important national athletic and cultural competitions of Athens? Or how dangerous it was to cross the Alps travelling from Italy to the city of Emona (actual Slovenia) in the Roman times?

This is the kind of stories that we’d like to collect from our audience, and this is where our Storytelling App comes to help! A story is a narrative that can be enhanced by all the multimedia content that can help the readers (especially the non-specialists) understand and contextualize the words of the text. Furthermore, we should never forget that an inscription is a beautiful multimedia object! Therefore, we want to enable our authors to insert pictures and other  representations to help your audience imagine what the visual impact of the inscribed monument was and still is.

Lucio da Treviri

*** [D(is) M(anibus)] et memoriae aetern(ae) L(uci) Secundius Octavi Treveri acerbissima morte defuncti qui cum ex incendio seminudus effugisset posthabita[...]
read Story»

An Inscription in Daglingworth

In August 2013 we went looking for some inscriptions among which this one. Getting to the place wasn’t easy. But we arrived[...]
testa serpente
read Story»

The Trophy of the battle of Platea

Sulthanamet Square in Istanbul hosts part of one of the most important monuments survived from ancient times: the trophy of the[...]
  This is the story of a young quaestor, Lucius Quinctius, who held the post during the first Punic War.[...]
Lucio Cassio Filippo, his wife Atilia Pomptilla together with Filippo’s father were exiled to Sardinia by the Emperor Nero, probably because they were opponents of his power. They spent their lives in Karalis (modern Cagliari). Pomptilla and Filippo, in spite of their condition, lived happily together for 42 years, unfortunately Filippo fell seriously ill during the exile (because of malaria, a common disease because of the unhealthy environment in some places of the ancient Sardinia) and his faithful wife, so in love with him, asked the Gods to let her die instead of her husband. Even if it seems impossible, her prayers were fulfilled: Filippo healed and she suddenly died as in the myth of Alcestis. Filippo also died a little later and his ashes were preserved close to his wife’s. The incredible story of this love is witnessed by the inscriptions of the so called “Viper’s Cave”.

Tuesday, November 29, 2016

Elephantine Reports Online

[First posted in AWOL 13 November 2012, updated 29 November 2016 (no longer accessible at the original site - links now go to the Internet Archive)]

Elephantine Grenzstadt und Handelsposten an der Südgrenze Ägyptens - Southern border town and trading post of Ancient Egypt
Fig.1: Elephantine: panoramic view © DAI
DAI - Deutsches Archäologisches Institut
...The aim of the excavations at Elephantine is to provide a coherent picture of the different parts of an ancient settlement and the interrelations between its temples, houses and cemeteries. Detailing the cultural development of the site, and using it as a source to extrapolate settlement patterns in other, less archaeologically accessible settlements is part of the objective of the mission. It is a rare moment when mud-brick settlement remains can be viewed by the public. This was formally made available as an open-air onsite museum in 1998.

The research program at Elephantine intends to not only excavate large portions of the site and to study and restore it, but to try to understand Elephantine’s role in the larger economical, political, ethnical and social contexts, both on the regional and the supra-regional level. The work aims to follow, diachronically, the developments across the different époques and disciplines. For such an approach, the preservation of the site and its layers with its moderate extension offers ideal conditions.

Currently, the mission is supporting the efforts of the Supreme Council of Antiquities to restore and refurbish the old museum on Elephantine Island...

Online: Excavation and Restoration on Elephantine Island

33rd season 2004 (pdf, 2.99 Mbyte)
34th season 2005 (pdf, 3.21 Mbyte)
35th season 2006 (pdf, 3.21 Mbyte)
36th Season 2007 (pdf, 3.63 Mbyte)
37th Season 2008 (pdf, 2.34 Mbyte)
38th Season 2009 (pdf, 1.94 Mbyte)
39th Season 2010 (pdf, 6.09 Mbyte)
40th Season 2011 (pdf, 4.77 Mbyte)
41st Season 2012 (pdf,5.3 Mbyte)

Open Access Egyptology: Thotweb

[First posted in AWOL 9 February 2011, updated 29 November 2016]

Thotweb Égyptologie
Thotweb was created in 1997 by a group of fellow students in egyptology. Its aim is to help spreading egyptological information throughout the world and to stimulate international cooperation.
At the time being, most of it is in french, but it will be eventually translated into english, except for the research articles, which will remain in their original languages.
Its main divisions are :
Our "Portal" is one of the biggest of the egyptological web. Continuously updated, it features pages, that means that a web site can be listed several times according to its content. This thematic approach makes it very useful. The sub-divisions of our portal are:
Our "Encyclopedia" is for the layman and the egyptologist alike. It has short notices and articles, with links to relevant egyptian inscriptions in adobat pdf format. For instance, someone interested in the reign of king Ahmose will be able to download its great inscription in Karnak, the autobiography of Ahmose, son of Abana, and the donation stela of queen Ahmose-Nefertary. It is like a virtual library at your disposal.
We also produce CD-Rom reeditions of ancient and useful egyptological books. They are in our "Library" section.
The aim of our "Virtual tour" is to provide photographs of archaelogical sites. They are rationnaly classified, according to the numerotation and the maps of the "Porter and Moss". It takes time to make it. If you want to share your photographs too, you are quite welcome.
The "Professional" section presents research works, interviews, and lists hundreds of academic researches. If you are writing a Ph.D which is not listed, please contact us.
We also host a "Forum", in fact a discussion list, and you are welcome to join.
Our "News" are also regularly updated, and provide information on discoveries and symposiums alike.
Lastly, our "Travel" section, still under development, will present some facts helping to arrange travels to Egypt.
I hope you will find Thotweb useful. Don't hesitate to let me know of any criticism or remarks you might like to do.

Call for Participants: Editing biographies of women classicists

Wikipedia Editathon
by
Wikipedia currently hosts around 200 biographies of classicists, of which only approximately 10% are of women. This WCC initiative is taking steps towards redressing this gender imbalance, by training and encouraging classicists to edit Wikipedia with this focus.

We are offering a free face-to-face training event and editathon, supported by Wikimedia UK, to launch a programme of more informal remote editing sessions. This launch event will take place at the Institute of Classical Studies (ICS), Senate House, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HU, from 10.30-17.30 on 23rd January 2017.

Thanks to the generous sponsorship of the ICS this event is free to attend, with lunch and coffee provided. Places are, however, limited, and registration is therefore essential. For those unable to travel to London, participation via Skype is also possible. Participants with disabilities are welcome; if you need particular support to enable you to take part, please let us know.

To reserve a place (either to participate in person or via Skype) and for further details please email the organisers, Claire Millington (claire.millington [at] kcl.ac.uk) and Emma Bridges (e.e.bridges [at] open.ac.uk) by 16th January 2017.

Ovid's Metamorphoses, by C. Northrup

Ovid's Metamorphoses
By C. Northrup
Check the self-portrait in the lamp ;)
Hello!  My name is Charlie and this is my comic!  Well, it’s not entirely my comic… I am translating and adapting a 2000+ year old Latin poem called the Metamorphoses.  It’s written by a real awesome dude named Ovid, who lived approximately 43 BCE – 17/18 CE –  so, really, he should get the writing credit…  I’ve modified some things here and there, so I will always post the corresponding lines of the poem below, along with my translation. (Latin nerds: feel free to email me and criticise my translation!)  It is my stated goal to remain as faithful to the poem as possible, but I do like to make it accessible to modern audiences at the same time.  So, check the Latin and throw something at me if I deviate too far!
I’m also doing a little PhD dissertation on this poem, so I will gush about the poem and the context below, if you fancy a gander at my ramblings…

Open Access Journal: Bulletin de l'Institut Egyptien

[First posted in AWOL 2 December 2012, updated 29 November 2016]

Bulletin de l'Institut Egyptien
http://digi.ub.uni-heidelberg.de/diglitData/introimage/bie1899.jpg
1.Ser. 1 (1859)
1.Ser. 2 (1859)
1.Ser. 3 (1860)
1.Ser. 4 (1860)
1.Ser. 5 (1861)  
1.Ser. 6 (1861)
1.Ser. 7 (1862)
1.Ser. 8 (1862-1863)
1.Ser. 9 (1863-1864-1865)
1.Ser. 10 (1866-1867-1868)
1.Ser. 11 (1869-1871)
1.Ser. 13 (1874-1875)

2.Ser. 1.1880(1882)
2.Ser. 2.1881(1883)
2.Ser. 3.1882(1883)
2.Ser. 8.1887(1888)
2.Ser. 9.1888(1889)
2.Ser. 10.1889(1890)
3.Ser. 1.1890(1891)
3.Ser. 2.1891(1892)
3.Ser. 3.1892(1893)
3.Ser. 5.1894(1895)
3.Ser. 7..1897(1898)
3.Ser. 6.1895(1896)
3.Ser. 9.1898(1899)
3.Ser. 4.1893(1894)
3.Ser. 10.1889
4.Ser. 1-2 (1900-1901)
4.Ser. 3-4 (1902-1903)
4.Ser. 5-6 (1904-1905)
4.Ser. 7 (1906)
 
5.Ser. 1-2 (1907-1908)
5.Ser. 3-4 (1909-1910)
5.Ser. 5-8 (1911-1914)
5.Ser. 9-10 (1915-1916)
5.Ser. 11-12 (1917-1918) 

6.Ser. 1-2 (1918-1920)
6.Ser. 3-4 (1920-1922)
6.Ser. 5-7 (1922-1925)

Alalach-Archiv, Manfred Dietrich &Oswald Loretz

Alalach-Archiv, Manfred Dietrich &Oswald Loretz
Répertoire onomastique

Fotos der Alalach-Tafeln

Im Sommersemester 1963 haben wir an dem Seminar über die alphabetisch-ugaritischen Texte der neuesten Publikation von Ch. Virolleaud, „Textes en cunéiformes alphabétiques des archives est, ouest et centrales“ (Mission de Ras Shamra VII, Paris 1957) aus den Ausgrabungs-Kampagnen 15-17 (1951-1953) im Palastareal teilgenommen, das Prof. Wolfram von Soden seinen fortgeschrittenen Studierenden als Ergänzung ihres Studiums der Altorientalistik angeboten hatte. Entsprechend den Interessen des Seminarleiters kamen dabei wiederholt die linguistischen und kulturellen Parallelen zur Sprache, die zwischen den Texten der Palastarchive Ugarits aus dem 13. Jh. und denen aus den Palastarchiven von Alalach/Tell Açana des 14. Jh. (= Alalach IV) bestanden, die D.J. Wiseman 1953 in „The Alalakh Tablets“ (Occasional Publications of the British Institute of Archaeology at Ankara 2, London) zugänglich gemacht hatte. Das hat uns angeregt, einzelne Beispiele zu überprüfen und die Bewandtnis ihrer Parallelität zu erforschen. Dabei fiel uns alsbald auf, daß der Wortlaut der Texte, wie ihn Ch. Virolleaud und D.J. Wiseman in Autographie, Umschrift und teilweise sorgfältiger Diskussion vorgelegt hatten, häufig nicht zuverlässig genug war, eine Antwort auf die linguistischen und kulturgeschichtlichen Fragen zu geben, die wir an sie hatten. Die Überprüfung einzelner Texte aufgrund von Photographien und/oder Autopsie im British Museum, London, und im Louvre, Paris, ergab, daß dies auf eine mitunter fehlerhafte Wiedergabe ihres Wortlauts zurückzuführen war. Das führte uns zum Entschluß, eine Kollation aller Tontafeloriginale in den Museen durchzuführen, bevor wir uns weiterführenden Arbeiten der Textinterpretation widmeten. Wie es sich bald zeigen sollte, war dieser Entschluß richtig. Da wir uns 1963 schon darauf verständigt hatten, unsere gemeinsamen Forschungsaktivitäten auf den Wortschatz der alphabetischen Texte aus Ugarit und dessen Beitrag für die Ergründung desjenigen der westsemitischen Epigraphik und des Hebräischen im Alten Testament zu konzentrieren, haben wir die Arbeit an den Texten aus Alalach als einen unerwarteten, allerdings auch unerläßlichen ersten Schritt für unsere Ugarit-Arbeiten eingestuft...
 > Systematische Klassifikation
 > Fotos der "AlT"-Texte
 > Fotos anderer publizierter Texte aus Alalach

 > HPM

Monday, November 28, 2016

Open Access Publications from the Institut français du Proche-Orient

[First posted in AWOL 26 February 2014, updated 28 November 2016]

Collections électroniques de l’Ifpo - Livres en ligne des Presses de l’Institut français du Proche-Orient
http://books.openedition.org/ifpo/docannexe/image/2807/option-50-110x90.png
Les Presses de l’Institut français du Proche-Orient assurent la diffusion et la valorisation des recherches menées au sein des territoires scientifiques investis par l’Institut dans les sociétés du Proche-Orient (la Syrie, le Liban, la Jordanie, les territoires palestiniens, l’Irak) dans l’ensemble des disciplines des sciences humaines et sociales depuis l’antiquité jusqu’à nos jours.
Au rythme d’une production annuelle d’une quinzaine de titres (auxquels il faut ajouter les coéditions), les publications de l’Ifpo continuent de développer des collections fortes d’un fonds de près de 400 titres existant depuis 1922 et héritier de l’histoire de la recherche française au Proche-Orient.
Les Presses de l’Ifpo recourent régulièrement à la coédition en partenariat avec des maisons d’édition privées (Actes Sud, Khartala, Economica-Anthropos) ou d’autres instituts de recherche (Orient Institut, CNRS Liban) pour conduire ses projets d’édition.