Saturday, September 30, 2017

Dag Norberg, A Practical Handbook of Medieval Latin (Paris 1980)

Dag Norberg, A Practical Handbook of Medieval Latin (Paris 1980)
(translated by R.H. Johnson, for non-commercial use only)

Latin at the End of the Imperial Age

Latin in Pre-Carolingian Gaul

Latin in Africa and Spain: The Sixth through the Eighth Centuries

Latin in the Pre-Carolingian British Isles

Latin in Italy: The Sixth Through the Tenth Centuries

The Carolingian Reform and Latin North of the Alps and Pyrenees before the Year 1000

Medieval Latin after the Year 1000

HyperEpos: Epic on the Internet

HyperEpos: Epic on the Internet
Responding to the lack of genre-based sites on the web, I've gathered here an array of sites focused on epic poetry, aiming for the occasionally quirky as well as the canonical vision of the genre.  In addition to the links to individual poems and poets, I've tried to incorporate a few key sites for chronological study. Thus, links to sites like Perseus, The Labyrinth or Romantic Circles, with all their wealth of connections, are included at the bottom of the appropriate page. Your comments and suggestions for inclusion or updating are appreciated.  Like all good sites, this one should be perpetually evolving, and appropriately enough, in the midst of things. I update the pages as often as I can (but time's wingéd chariot hurries near).
For familiarity's sake, the organization is (loosely) chronological, with a few pages (Non-Western, American, and Women's Epic) based in kinds rather than times of origin.  The chronologies as well as the selections currently show too clearly my own as well as the Internet's strong Anglo-American bias. And I have finally incorporated a search page for this directory, which may help if you're not sure where to start looking.

Note:  Though I do include links to some creative, occasionally naive endeavors, I try not to include sites like the following (straight from the original):  "Oral poets can whole heroic poems a formulae in construction of their epics although in this case Homer did not."

Search HyperEpos
General Epic Resources
Women's Epic
Non-Western Epic
American Epic
Pre-Classical Epic
Homeric Epic
Other Greek Epic
Latin Epic
Medieval Epic
Renaissance Epic
Neoclassical Epic
Romantic Epic
Victorian Epic
Modernist Epic
Contemporary Epic

Society for the Oral Reading of Greek and Latin Literature (SORGLL)

[First listed in AWOL 6 December 2012, updates 30 September 2017]

Society for the Oral Reading of Greek and Latin Literature (SORGLL)
http://www.rhapsodes.fll.vt.edu/images/rhapsodos5.jpg
It is generally acknowledged that the literature of the Greeks and Romans is among the most beautiful and powerful expressions of the human mind. It is also generally known that this body of literature was created with the intention of being orally performed and aurally experienced by a group of listeners, large or small, and was not intended to be read silently with the eyes alone. The element of sound is therefore fundamental to a full esthetic experience and understanding of Greek and Latin literature. And yet, the traditional method of teaching Greek and Latin ignores or neglects the sounds of these languages, as if they were of little or no importance, thus depriving students of the basic literary reward of hearing and reproducing beautiful poetry. It is as if students were to study Mozart solely from musical scores and not be given the opportunity of hearing his music. It is the aim or our Society to encourage students and teachers to listen to and to reproduce the sounds of Greek and Latin literature, thereby enriching the whole study process of these languages. Fortunately, linguistic and metrical research of the last century now permits us to acquire a close approximation of the pronunciation of classical Greek and Latin, a result which we call the "restored pronunciation" (basic bibliography below). Our Society feels that it is our professional duty to use the results of this research in our teaching of Greek and Latin as a means for achieving maximum authenticity and esthetic pleasure in the reading of Greek and Latin literary works. As a means toward this end, our Society presents programs oriented to the oral performance of Classical literature at the annual APA meetings, we publish a newsletter, we have established this website to present pertinent information, audio clips, queries and discussion, while several members or our Society regularly give recitals of Greek and Latin literature in schools, colleges and universities throughout the country.

We cordially invite you to join the Society for the Oral Reading of Greek and Latin Literature and to share our experience in hearing and reproducing the true sounds of Homer, Vergil, and the other Classical authors.

Home

Catullus 5

Read in the restored pronunciation of classical Latin
by Robert P. Sonkowsky, University of Minnesota.
 
Cicero, In Catilinam I.1-3

Read in the restored pronunciation of classical Latin
by Robert P. Sonkowsky, University of Minnesota.
 
Horace, Odes 1.22  

Read in the restored pronunciation of classical Latin
by Robert P. Sonkowsky, University of Minnesota.
 
Juvenal, Satire I.1-30  
Read in the restored pronunciation of classical Latin
by Mark Miner, University of Georgia.

 
Martial, Epigrams I.96, V.41, X.30 
Read in the restored pronunciation of classical Latin
by Wakefield Foster, University of Missouri.

 
Ovid, Metamorphoses 8.183-235 
Read in the restored pronunciation of classical Latin
by Stephen G. Daitz, City University of New York.

 
Seneca, Thyestes 766-804  
Read in the restored pronunciation of classical Latin
by Katharina Volk, Columbia University.


Statius, Thebaid I. 46-87

Read in the restored pronunciation of classical Latin
by Stephen G. Daitz, City University of New York.
 
Terence, Eunuch 232-264

Read in the restored pronunciation of classical Latin
by Matthew Dillon, Loyola University.

 
Vergil, Aeneid, Book 1, 1-49

Read in the restored pronunciation of classical Latin
by Robert P. Sonkowsky, University of Minnesota.
 
Vergil, Aeneid, Book 4, 296-396

Read in the restored pronunciation of classical Latin
by Stephen G. Daitz, City University of New York.

Alkman 58
       read in the restored pronunciation of classical Greek
       by Stephen G. Daitz, City University of New York.
 
Arkhilokhos 67
       read in the restored pronunciation of classical Greek
       by Stephen G. Daitz, City University of New York.
 
Aristophanes,  Birds 227-262
       read in the restored pronunciation of classical Greek
       by Stephen G. Daitz, City University of New York.
 
Demosthenes, On the Crown 199-208
       read in the restored pronunciation of classical Greek
       by Stephen G. Daitz, City University of New York.
 
Euripides, Trojan Women 740-779
       read in the restored pronunciation of classical Greek
       by Stephen G. Daitz, City University of New York.
 
Homer, Iliad, Book 1, lines 1-52
       read in the restored pronunciation of classical Greek
       by Stephen G. Daitz, City University of New York.
 
Menander, Dyskolos, lines 711-747
       read in the restored pronunciation of classical Greek
       by Mark Miner, University of Georgia.
 
Pindar, Olympian 1.1-58
       read in the restored pronunciation of classical Greek
       by William Mullen, Bard College.
 
Sappho 1
       read in the restored pronunciation of classical Greek
       by Stephen G. Daitz, City University of New York.
 
Sophokles, Elektra 1126-1170
       read in the restored pronunciation of classical Greek
       by Rachel Kitzinger, Vassar College.
 

And see also
Aural Akkadian: Babylonian and Assyrian Poetry and Literature: An Archive of Recordings


Friday, September 29, 2017

Open Access Journal: Culture Without Context: Newsletter of the Illicit Antiquities Research Centre

[First posted in AWOL 20 November 2012, updated 29 September 2017]

Culture Without Context: Newsletter of the Illicit Antiquities Research Centre
ISSN: 1464-1925
http://traffickingculture.org/app/themes/trafficking/images/header.png
The Illicit Antiquities Research Centre (IARC) was established in 1996 at the McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research at the University of Cambridge, with a mission to research and raise awareness of the trade in illicit antiquities. It was closed in 2007. As part of its mission, the IARC published a bi-annual newsletter, Culture Without Context, which contained news, commentary and original research on all aspects of the trade. The McDonald Institute has kindly allowed us to make available here for download pdfs of the complete run of twenty issues.

Open Access Journal: Rheinisches Museum für Philologie

[First posted in AWOL 25 January 2010. Updated 29 September 2017]

Rheinisches Museum für Philologie
ISSN: 0035-449X
http://rhm.phil-fak.uni-koeln.de/fileadmin/templates/RRZK-Vorlagen/images/siegel.gif
Die Zeitschrift wurde 1827 unter dem Titel „Rheinisches Museum für Philologie, Geschichte und griechische Philosophie“ von Barthold Georg Niebuhr, August Böckh und Christian August Brandis gegründet und erschien unter diesem Namen bis 1829/32. Von 1832/33 bis 1839 wurde die Zeitschrift unter dem Titel „Rheinisches Museum für Philologie“ von Friedrich Gottlieb Welcker und August Ferdinand Naeke weitergeführt. Seit 1842 erscheint die „Neue Folge“ des „Rheinischen Museums für Philologie“. Erstherausgeber waren Friedrich Ritschl und Friedrich Gottlieb Welcker (vgl. auch C.W. Müller, Das Rheinische Museum für Philologie 1842–2007. Zum Erscheinen des 150. Bandes der Neuen Folge, RhM 150, 2007, 1–7).

Das „Rheinische Museum für Philologie“ ist die älteste, bis heute erscheinende altertumswissenschaftliche Fachzeitschrift. Seit ihrer Gründung veröffentlicht sie wissenschaftliche Beiträge zu Sprache, Literatur und Geschichte des griechischen und römischen Altertums und seiner Rezeption in den Sprachen Deutsch, Englisch, Französisch, Italienisch und Latein. Sie ist international verbreitet, und die im „Rheinischen Museum für Philologie“ veröffentlichten Artikel sind jeweils drei Jahre nach Erscheinen der Druckfassung kostenfrei im Internet abrufbar.

Alle eingesandten Beiträge werden von wenigstens zwei Experten begutachtet, die dem Herausgebergremium angehören oder extern hinzugezogen werden. Für weitere Auskünfte wende man sich an den Herausgeber unter: Bernd.Manuwald@uni-koeln.de
Rheinisches Museum für Philologie (Neue Folge) 
Open access to volumes 1 (1842) -  155 (2013)

Band 153 (2010)

Aufsätze

Miszellen

Band 154 (2011)

Aufsätze

Miszellen

Band 155 (2012)

Aufsätze

Miszellen

Band 156 (2013)

Aufsätze

Miszellen

Band 157 (2014)

Aufsätze

  • Barrios Lech, Peter: The 1st Person Plural ’Hortatory‘ Subjunctive in Plautus and Terence. [272]
  • Bretzigheimer, Gerlinde: Lukians Ἀναβιοῦντες ἢ ἁλιεύς. Eine Analyse. [278]
  • Broggiato, Maria: Aristophanes and Aeschylus’ Persians: Hellenistic Discussions on Ar. Ran. 1028f. [1]
  • Burkard, Thorsten: Amor odit inertes. Die mythologische Beispielreihe in Ovid, Amores 1,9. [113]
  • Colombo, Maurizio: La presunta cacozelia di Virgilio. Contributo all’esegesi di Don. uita Verg. 44 e alla storia della critica letteraria. [327]
  • Graninger, Denver: Ambracian Cruces (SEG 41.540A). [225]
  • Hausburg, Bianca C.: Nachklassisches Griechisch bei Plautus? Zu Pseudolus 483–4 und Bacchides 1162. [16]
  • Santorelli, Biagio: Pauper et dives inimici. Un perduto tema declamatorio in un palinsesto latino. [320]
  • Schollmeyer, Jonas: Homer und Stesichoros in Platons Phaidros 243a3–b3. [239]
  • Suerbaum, Werner: Tacitus-Kenntnisse vor Erfindung des Buchdrucks. Der Literarhistoriker Sicco Polenton aus Padua würdigt Tacitus um 1430. [75]
  • Ulacco, Angela / Opsomer, Jan: Elements and Elemental Properties in Timaeus Locrus. [154]
  • Witt, Mathias: Die verlorenen Galen-Kommentare zu den hippokratischen Schriften De ulceribus und De vulneribus in capite – Fragmentsammlung und Erläuterungen. [37]
  • Woods, David: Caligula Displays Caesonia (Suet. Calig. 25.3). [27]
  • Zajonz, Sandra: Apagoge bei Tötungsvorwurf. Ein neuer Vorschlag zum Verständnis von Dem. 23,80. [251]

Miszellen

  • Augoustakis, Antonios: Fish Imagery in Petronius’ Satyrica : Pisciculi and the Emperor? [211]
  • Begass, Christoph: Siegesakklamationen, Phantomwörter und ein Fragment des Johannes Antiochenus (fr. 214 Müller = 306 Roberto = 237 Mariev). [363]
  • Costa, Stefano: Seneca e Trasea Peto: Due tradizioni indirette di un proverbio stoicheggiante. [104]
  • Eck, Werner: Sergius Paullus, der Liebhaber der Philosophie in Lucians Peregrinus Proteus. [221]
  • Felgentreu, Fritz: Laelius tadelt die maiores. Eine vergessene Korruptel in Cic. Lael. 40. [207]
  • Lucarini, Carlo Martino: Note Latine (III). [359]
  • Nicolosi, Anika: Una negletta testimonianza archilochea? A proposito di Dinol. fr. 6 K.-A. [357]
  • Power, Tristan: Galba and Priam in Tacitus’ Histories. [216]
  • Ramelli, Ilaria L.E.: Iamblichus, De anima 38 (66,12–15 Finamore / Dillon): A Resolving Conjecture? [106]

Band 158 (2015)

Aufsätze

  • Anghelina, Catalin: Clinging to the Fig Tree. A note on Od. 12.432–6. [8]
  • Anzinger, Silke: Post Oceanum nihil? Albinovanus Pedo und die Suche nach einer anderen Welt. [326]
  • Dominicy, Marc: Critical Notes on Catullus 61. [138]
  • Edwards, Rebecca M.: Caesar Telling Tales: Phaedrus and Tiberius. [167]
  • Fischer, Klaus-Dietrich: Ameisenkapriolen. Zu den griechischen Pulsbezeichnungen bei Isid. orig. 11,1,120. [44]
  • Freund, Stefan: Die Hetäre Leaina in Ciceros De gloria. [247]
  • Helmer, Étienne: La politique du mendiant. Une interprétation des Acharniens d’Aristophane. [113]
  • Horn, Fabian: Visualising Iliad 3,57: “Putting on the Shirt of Stone“. [1]
  • Jakobi, Rainer: Coronatus Grammaticus. [419]
  • Lingenberg, Wilfried: Kleine Schule der Echtheitskritik: Ars Amatoria 1,231–236. [16]
  • Nabel, Jake: Horace and the Tiridates Episode. [304]
  • Reinhardt, Tobias: On Endoxa in Aristotle’s Topics. [225]
  • Rudoni, Elia: La reazione di Diocleziano alle profezia sulla sua ascesa al potere. Nota ad Historia Augusta, Car. 15,1. [30]
  • Sannicandro, Lisa: Enea, Amarillide e i suoi coniuges: un’epistola di Giovanni Boccaccio a Francesco Petrarca (Ravenna, 18 Luglio 1353). [199]
  • Schubert, Christoph: Nepos als Biograph: der Tod des Atticus. [260]
  • Schwazer, Oliver: Die Sibylle in der Flasche (Petr. Sat. 48,8). [408]
  • Suerbaum, Werner: Jugurtha auf dem Schild des Königs Heinrich II. von Frankreich († 1559). Sallusts Bellum Jugurthinum in fünf Bildern und zwölf lateinischen Hexametern auf der „Targa del Cellini“. [65]
  • Warburg, Inés: Proposals for the Textual Tradition of the Poem De mortibus boum by Severus Sanctus Endelechius. [185]

Miszellen

  • Bostock, Robert: ‘No Comment’: Iliad 6,62. [104]
  • Cioffi, Robert: A Trugeranos for Seleukos? An Animal Name and the Power of the Exotic in Philemon, Neaira fr. 49 K.-A. [209]
  • Guignard, Christophe: Notules sur le texte du cod. 223 de la Bibliothèque de Photius (Diodore de Tarse, Contre le destin). [110]
  • Marseglia, Rochus: Cur Artemis κελαδεινή  nuncupetur. [206]
  • Mason, H.C.: Pediasimus on the Hesiodic Shield of Heracles. [220]
  • Poletti, Stefano: Lecti ferro. Una nota a Serv. Dan. Aen. 9,146. [213]
  • Schropp, Jack W.G.: Eine Bemerkung zum Συγγενικόν im Suda-Eintrag Suetons. [217]
  • Zago, Giovanni: De duobus locis Alexandri Aphrodisiensis libri De fato emendandis. [108]

Addendum

  • Begass, Christoph: Zu: Siegesakklamationen, Phantomwörter und ein Fragment des Johannes Antiochenus (fr. 214 Müller = 306 Roberto = 237 Mariev). [432]

Band 159 (2016)

Aufsätze

  • Berno, Francesca Romana: Ercole e Ulisse victores omnium terrorum? Nota testuale a Sen. Const. 2,1. [409]
  • Breternitz, Patrick: Was stand in Isidors Bibliothek? Zur Petronrezeption in den Etymologien Isidors von Sevilla. [99]
  • Comentale, Nicola / Most, Glenn W.: Hermipp. Μοῖραι frr. 48–*47 K-A: interpretazione e inversione. [1]
  • Corti, Aurora: PHerc. 454 (Epicuro, Sulla natura XXV). Edizione, traduzione, commento. [28]
  • Gagliardi, Paola: Non ego Daphnim iudice te metuam. Riflessioni su Virg. Ecl. 2,19–27. [392]
  • Hindermann, Judith: Aelian und die ποικιλία. Ordnung und Unordnung in De natura animalium. [71]
  • La Barbera, Sandro: Transabeo: un intruso nelle concordanze virgiliane. (Aen. 9.431s.) [191]
  • Liong, Katherine: Breathing Crime and Contagion: Catiline as scelus anhelans (Cic. Cat. 2.1). [348]
  • Lucarini, Carlo M.: Sequenze ioniche ed eolo-coriambiche nella tragedia. [113]
  • Luginbill, Robert D.: Cimon and Athenian Aid to Sparta: One Expedition or Two? [135]
  • Papakonstantinou, Zinon: Match Fixing and Victory in Greek Sport. [13]
  • Pieper, Christoph H.: Menenius Agrippa als exemplum für die frühe römische Beredsamkeit. Eine historische Spurensuche. [156]
  • Riedl, Petra: Das Spiel mit der Wirklichkeit. Der Irrealis in Ciceros Pro Milone. [369]
  • Seibold, Stefanie: Von verliebten Wieseln und scharrenden Hühnern – Aphrodite in der antiken Fabel (Aes. 50; Babr. 32 und 10; Phaedr. app. 11). [290]
  • Stroh, Wilfried: De fabulis Latinis in usum puerorum puellarumque scriptis. [225]
  • Verde, Francesco: The Gens Memmia, Lucretius’ Hymn to Venus, and the Sanctuary of Terracina: A Neglected Hypothesis. [60]
  • Vössing, Konrad: König Gelimers Machtergreifung in Procop. Vand. 1,9,8. [416]
  • Zingg, Emanuel: Manchmal um ein Iota abgewichen. Zu dem Langdiphthong in den Stammformen von σῴζω und seiner Behandlung in der modernen Philologie. [316]

Miszellen

  • Allen, Archibald: An Attic Coot for Hesychios. [437]
  • Döring, Klaus: Ἀλλὰ γάρ im Alkibiades I. [209]
  • Fetkenheuer, Klaus: Unerkannte Serviusbezüge in Isidors Etymologiae XII. [222]
  • Kayachev, Boris: Ciris 524: An Emendation. [433]
  • Lenfant, Dominique: Xenophon l’orateur peut-il supplanter le Pseudo-Xenophon? [214]
  • Mallan, Christopher: Velleius Paterculus 2.130.3 and the Son(s) of Drusus Caesar. [219]
  • Moseley, Geoffrey: Paul of Aegina, Pragmateia 6.88 and the evidence of Avicenna’s Qānūn. [439]
  • Vecchiato, Stefano: Artemide devastatrice di campi: Suid. A 366 (1,37 A.). [443]
  • Volk, Katharina: A Wise Man in an Old Country. Varro, Antiquitates rerum divinarum and [Plato], Letter 5. [429]

Band 160 (2017) - Heft 1

Aufsätze

  • Bergamo, Max: Eraclito in Plotino. [58]
  • Mayhew, Robert: Aristotle on the σκῶπες in Odyssey 5.66. [1]
  • Orth, Christian: Das Odysseus-Exemplum in Properz’ Paetus-Elegie (3,7,41–46). [36]
  • Schmitz, Philip: Οἶκος, πόλις und πολιτεία. Das Verhältnis von Familie und Staatsverfassung bei Aristoteles, im späteren Peripatos und in Ciceros de officiis. [9]
  • Schubert, Charlotte: Die Arbeitsweise Plutarchs: Notizen, Zitate und Placita. [43]
  • Stachon, Markus: Poetae in Hieronymus’ Chronik. Notizen zu Furius Bibaculus, Q. Cornificius und Cornelius Gallus. [97]

Miszellen

  • Eck, Werner: Annäherung an eine Frau: Domina te amo alias derido. [109]
  • Vannini, Guilio: Due note al
Band 155 (2012)
Band 155 (2012)
Band 155 (2012)
Band 155 (2012)



  • 1 - 6         (1842 - 1848)
  • 7 - 14       (1850 - 1859)
  • 15 - 24     (1860 - 1869)
  • 25 - 34     (1870 - 1879)
  • 45 - 54     (1890 - 1899)
  • 55 - 64     (1900 - 1909)
  • 65 - 72     (1910 - 1917/18)
  • 73 - 78     (1920 - 1929)
  • 79 - 88     (1930 - 1939)
  • 89 - 92     (1940 - 1944)
  • 93 - 102   (1950 - 1959)
  • 103 - 112 (1960 - 1969)
  • 113 - 122 (1970 - 1979)
  • 123 - 132 (1980 - 1989)
  • 133 - 142 (1990 - 1999)
  • 143 - 152 (2000 - 2009)
  • 153 -  …   (2010 - …     )
  • Rheinisches Museum für Philologie

    Rheinisches Museum für Philologie, Geschichte und griechische Philosophie

    Machine Translation and Automated Analysis of Cuneiform Languages

    Machine Translation and Automated Analysis of Cuneiform Languages
     
    The MTAAC project develops and applies new computerized methods to translate and analyze the contents of some 67,000 highly standardized administrative documents from southern Mesopotamia (ancient Iraq) from the 21st century BC. Our methodology, which combines machine learning with statistical and neural machine translation technologies, can then be applied to other ancient languages. This methodology, the translations, and the historical, social and economic data extracted from them, will be offered to the public in open access. 


    Open Access Journal: Ad Familiares – Classics for All’s online journal

    Ad Familiares – Classics for All’s online journal
    Welcome to Ad Familiares, our exclusive online journal. We will be publishing one article a month of current classical interest, commissioned by James Morwood (Wadham College, Oxford). We plan to add a new article every month. If any member of Classics for all would like to contribute a piece, could he or she please contact the editor at james.morwood at classics.ox.ac.uk.

    Open Access Journal: British Museum Studies in Ancient Egypt and Sudan (BMSAES)

    [First posted in AWOL 8 October 2009. Updated 29 September 2017]

    British Museum Studies in Ancient Egypt and Sudan (BMSAES)
    ISSN: 2049-5021 (on-line)
    http://www.britishmuseum.org/images/ResPub_BMSAES_19_304x176.jpg
    The British Museum Studies in Ancient Egypt and Sudan (BMSAES) is a peer-reviewed, academic journal dedicated to presenting research on all aspects of ancient Egypt and Sudan and the representation of these cultures in modern times.
    BMSAES is open-access: all articles in this journal can be viewed and downloaded free-of-charge.
    This journal offers scholars the opportunity to include a large number of colour images, and other multimedia content, where appropriate to the article. Accepted papers will be published as soon as possible: there is no defined publication schedule or deadlines, as with print journals. The articles do not need to concern British Museum objects or projects.
    For more open access publications of the British Museum, see here.